"A story is a way to say something that can't be said any other way." Flannery O'Connor  Your story has the power to tear down walls, build communities, or change the world.  We are working to collect the stories of everyone who has faced adversity and use them to help empower change.  If you have a story that you would like to share for us to help change the hearts of legislators we would appreciate it.  Right now we are particularly looking for stories of times that people have been discriminated against in the workplace.  If you have other stories about issues that have effected you we also welcome those.

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  • Anne Ireland
    commented 2018-11-29 13:39:41 -0800
    My name is Anne M. Ireland. My partner Keith and I have a 4 year old son, Kepler. We were pregnant with Kepler when I was 43 years old.


    We raise Kepler to be open and accepting of himself as well as others, to be honest, be respectful and to have fun in his life.


    When Keith and I met, we right away talked about having children. Because of my disability, which is cerebral palsy. If we do get legally married, then I lose SSDI and all or part of my benefits.


    I’m 48 now and we been trying to have another child, because we would like Kepler to have a little brother or sister, also we just would like to have another baby.


    Keith and I really would like to be able to adopt a new born baby. I called someone from a home society and when I told them that Keith and I weren’t married, the conversation was done. The person didn’t want to hear anymore. I think that our way, among other people’s way’s should all be considered and worked out as a individual bases, because everyone’s situation is different. If we could afford me getting off of my SSDI and if it didn’t matter if I had benefits or not, Keith and I would be married legally…


    It is hard for people with disabilities to do anything, little long, say that you want to get pregnant, adopt, or which ever you want to have a child, go though the process, and finally have a baby. This is because people with disabilities don’t have the support they should have, when going through the process of having a baby. When people with disabilities say they would like to have a baby, instead of getting the ooooo’s and awww’s, congratulations, and the "let us know.” Instead they’re more likely to get “now, come on, you don’t want that”, “you better be careful, now”, or that’s a lot for you to handle". I know this because, it happened to me before, while, and after I was pregnant. This is one of the reasons why I and maybe other people with disabilities have trouble with communicating and socializing with family, friends, medical professionals, staff, co-workers, neighbors, ect. I do know that it doesn’t look like “Anne has trouble with communicating or socializing”, and I do get “the point” across… But it is hard, because I’m so use to people not listing to me, not supporting, and putting down my ideas.


    I know that our family are meant to have another family member in our family and I’m trying to do everything to let that happen. Thank you for taking your time to read this.
  • Edison McDonald
    published this page in Get Involved 2018-01-03 10:03:11 -0800